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Dr. C. Paul* and Dr. Beth K.* Stocker

The legacy of C. Paul and Beth K. Stocker took root at Ohio University with an initial modest gift in 1962. Since that time, the couple established themselves as two of OHIO’s greatest benefactors whose contributions benefit OHIO’s students, faculty, and programs. In addition to establishing scholarship funds for arts and sciences, and engineering and technology, the Stockers also established the Russ College’s first visiting chair and professorship awards.

In 1979, Beth Stocker established The Stocker Foundation from the estate of her husband. The Stocker Foundation gift was the largest gift to Ohio University and any college of engineering at the time. Not long after the gift was established, the value of that initial generosity grew enormously, thanks to a surge in stock associated with the gift. The additional income created an endowed chair position in electrical engineering, equipment purchases, and research. Because of this generosity, inside of the first year Russ College was able to purchase more equipment than it had in the previous decade. The fortunate outcome also endowed the Stocker unrestricted fund, which supports OHIO’s 1804 Fund, and enabled the College to increase funded research more than twentyfold.

The 1804 Fund, which was designed to foster innovation and collaboration across disciplines, supports the University's core mission of "maintaining, strengthening, and enhancing a learning-centered community." The 1804 Fund recently celebrated its thirtieth anniversary, bringing the total of awards to approximately $15 million. Since awarding its first grants in 1980, the fund has supported more than 600 projects and programs across campus.

In 1983, renovation of West Green’s Crook Hall began. It was transformed into today’s C. Paul and Beth K. Stocker Engineering Center, a five-story complex joining all engineering and technology departments. 

Before passing away in 2005, Beth Stocker established four Manasseh Cutler Scholarships and, most recently, she supported the funding of an Urban Scholar.

In 1978, Beth Stocker was named Ohio University Alumni Association’s alumna of the year and in 1995, she received the John C. Baker Founders Award. In 2003, Ohio University awarded the Stockers the Founder’s Citation, the University’s highest honor.

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Dr. C. Paul* and Dr. Beth K.* Stocker

The legacy of C. Paul and Beth K. Stocker took root at Ohio University with an initial modest gift in 1962. Since that time, the couple established themselves as two of OHIO’s greatest benefactors whose contributions benefit OHIO’s students, faculty, and programs. In addition to establishing scholarship funds for arts and sciences, and engineering and technology, the Stockers also established the Russ College’s first visiting chair and professorship awards.

In 1979, Beth Stocker established The Stocker Foundation from the estate of her husband. The Stocker Foundation gift was the largest gift to Ohio University and any college of engineering at the time. Not long after the gift was established, the value of that initial generosity grew enormously, thanks to a surge in stock associated with the gift. The additional income created an endowed chair position in electrical engineering, equipment purchases, and research. Because of this generosity, inside of the first year Russ College was able to purchase more equipment than it had in the previous decade. The fortunate outcome also endowed the Stocker unrestricted fund, which supports OHIO’s 1804 Fund, and enabled the College to increase funded research more than twentyfold.

The 1804 Fund, which was designed to foster innovation and collaboration across disciplines, supports the University's core mission of "maintaining, strengthening, and enhancing a learning-centered community." The 1804 Fund recently celebrated its thirtieth anniversary, bringing the total of awards to approximately $15 million. Since awarding its first grants in 1980, the fund has supported more than 600 projects and programs across campus.

In 1983, renovation of West Green’s Crook Hall began. It was transformed into today’s C. Paul and Beth K. Stocker Engineering Center, a five-story complex joining all engineering and technology departments. 

Before passing away in 2005, Beth Stocker established four Manasseh Cutler Scholarships and, most recently, she supported the funding of an Urban Scholar.

In 1978, Beth Stocker was named Ohio University Alumni Association’s alumna of the year and in 1995, she received the John C. Baker Founders Award. In 2003, Ohio University awarded the Stockers the Founder’s Citation, the University’s highest honor.

" rel="lightbox">Dr. C. Paul* and Dr. Beth K.* Stocker

Dr. Fritz J.* and Dolores H.* Russ

Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ made their first gift to Ohio University -- $25 -- in 1962. Since then, they have become OHIO’s top donors, giving through an estate bequest and other gifts. Their estate bequest in 2008 marked the largest to any public engineering college in the U.S., and the largest to any public institution of higher education in the state of Ohio. Endowments established through the Russes’ gifts provide approximately $4 million in funds for the Russ College of Engineering and Technology each year.

"It’s incredibly humbling to realize how much Fritz and Dolores trusted in, and believed in the promise of, the students, faculty and staff of the Russ College to have chosen us for this legacy,” say Russ College Dean Dennis Irwin. 

A gift from the Russes in 1999 established the National Academy of Engineering’s Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize. Comparable to the Nobel Prize, it is the top bioengineering prize in the world, awarding recipients $500,000. The prize has been awarded to the bioengineers including those responsible for inventing the implantable heart pacemaker, kidney dialysis, and automated DNA sequencing that helped enable the Human Genome Project.

"Fritz and Dolores Russ imagined a college that is visionary in its planning and purposeful in implementing the best student-centered engineering education experience in the country," said Ohio University President Roderick J. McDavis. "Theirs is a transformational legacy that has forever changed the face and the heart of the Russ College while lifting up the engineering and technology professions and their profound effect on the human condition."

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Dr. Fritz J.* and Dolores H.* Russ

Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ made their first gift to Ohio University -- $25 -- in 1962. Since then, they have become OHIO’s top donors, giving through an estate bequest and other gifts. Their estate bequest in 2008 marked the largest to any public engineering college in the U.S., and the largest to any public institution of higher education in the state of Ohio. Endowments established through the Russes’ gifts provide approximately $4 million in funds for the Russ College of Engineering and Technology each year.

"It’s incredibly humbling to realize how much Fritz and Dolores trusted in, and believed in the promise of, the students, faculty and staff of the Russ College to have chosen us for this legacy,” say Russ College Dean Dennis Irwin. 

A gift from the Russes in 1999 established the National Academy of Engineering’s Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize. Comparable to the Nobel Prize, it is the top bioengineering prize in the world, awarding recipients $500,000. The prize has been awarded to the bioengineers including those responsible for inventing the implantable heart pacemaker, kidney dialysis, and automated DNA sequencing that helped enable the Human Genome Project.

"Fritz and Dolores Russ imagined a college that is visionary in its planning and purposeful in implementing the best student-centered engineering education experience in the country," said Ohio University President Roderick J. McDavis. "Theirs is a transformational legacy that has forever changed the face and the heart of the Russ College while lifting up the engineering and technology professions and their profound effect on the human condition."

" rel="lightbox">Dr. Fritz J.* and Dolores H.* Russ

Dr. Gilbert S. and Ursula B. Farfel

Ursula Farfel’s Swiss father moved the family to his native country when she was 9 years old, but her mother, a Cleveland native, encouraged her children to attend college in the United States. In the fall of 1950, Farfel returned to the U.S. and worked for two years at The Cleveland Museum of Art. In 1952 she came to Ohio University on a tuition scholarship and earned her AB in German and psychology in 1956.

“I found it very different from Switzerland in the attitudes of the teachers toward the students,” she says. “I remember in the introductory speech to the freshmen hearing how important we were as citizens of the future. It made a big impression on me about the value of the student.” That notion stayed with Farfel, who later earned a master’s degree in German from Rice University.

Dr. Gilbert Farfel was raised in Mount Vernon, New York. He earned his BS from Antioch College in 1953 and his MD from Thomas Jefferson Medical College in 1957. Dr. Farfel began his career in internal medicine in Houston, Texas, and moved on to a small group practice in San Luis Obispo, Calif. He joined the Permanente Medical Group of Northern California in 1964, where he was a member of the Department of Internal Medicine until his retirement in 1992.

The Farfels demonstrate how much they value students through their generosity to Ohio University. They channel their giving to areas where they see the greatest need. “I received a scholarship the whole time I was a student. I was very grateful for the support and wanted to give something back,” says Ursula Farfel. “I looked around and saw that the sciences get a lot of resources from the government, commerce gets support from the business world, but languages and classics don’t get much support.” With that in mind, the Farfels established an endowed scholarship at Ohio University in 1997 that was to rotate between modern languages and classics. In 2000, they established a second endowment to fund both scholarships simultaneously.

In 1999, the Farfels donated a collection of more than 500 printed leaves (or incunables) and manuscripts to the Ohio University Libraries. The collection, which they obtained during nearly 30 years of world travel, comprises pages from books published in the 15th century as well as handwritten manuscripts transcribed before the invention of the printing press.

“We wanted to give the incunables and manuscript pages to a place that didn’t have that kind of thing,” says Dr. Farfel, “where you might otherwise have to get on a train or a plane to see something like that.”

In 2001, the Farfels committed $1 million that contributed an additional $250,000 to each of their scholarships as well as established a $500,000 endowment to support the Ursula and Gilbert Farfel Prize for Excellence in Investigative Reporting.

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Dr. Gilbert S. and Ursula B. Farfel

Ursula Farfel’s Swiss father moved the family to his native country when she was 9 years old, but her mother, a Cleveland native, encouraged her children to attend college in the United States. In the fall of 1950, Farfel returned to the U.S. and worked for two years at The Cleveland Museum of Art. In 1952 she came to Ohio University on a tuition scholarship and earned her AB in German and psychology in 1956.

“I found it very different from Switzerland in the attitudes of the teachers toward the students,” she says. “I remember in the introductory speech to the freshmen hearing how important we were as citizens of the future. It made a big impression on me about the value of the student.” That notion stayed with Farfel, who later earned a master’s degree in German from Rice University.

Dr. Gilbert Farfel was raised in Mount Vernon, New York. He earned his BS from Antioch College in 1953 and his MD from Thomas Jefferson Medical College in 1957. Dr. Farfel began his career in internal medicine in Houston, Texas, and moved on to a small group practice in San Luis Obispo, Calif. He joined the Permanente Medical Group of Northern California in 1964, where he was a member of the Department of Internal Medicine until his retirement in 1992.

The Farfels demonstrate how much they value students through their generosity to Ohio University. They channel their giving to areas where they see the greatest need. “I received a scholarship the whole time I was a student. I was very grateful for the support and wanted to give something back,” says Ursula Farfel. “I looked around and saw that the sciences get a lot of resources from the government, commerce gets support from the business world, but languages and classics don’t get much support.” With that in mind, the Farfels established an endowed scholarship at Ohio University in 1997 that was to rotate between modern languages and classics. In 2000, they established a second endowment to fund both scholarships simultaneously.

In 1999, the Farfels donated a collection of more than 500 printed leaves (or incunables) and manuscripts to the Ohio University Libraries. The collection, which they obtained during nearly 30 years of world travel, comprises pages from books published in the 15th century as well as handwritten manuscripts transcribed before the invention of the printing press.

“We wanted to give the incunables and manuscript pages to a place that didn’t have that kind of thing,” says Dr. Farfel, “where you might otherwise have to get on a train or a plane to see something like that.”

In 2001, the Farfels committed $1 million that contributed an additional $250,000 to each of their scholarships as well as established a $500,000 endowment to support the Ursula and Gilbert Farfel Prize for Excellence in Investigative Reporting.

" rel="lightbox">Dr. Gilbert S. and Ursula B. Farfel

Dr. Jeanette Grasselli and Dr. Glenn Brown 

It is easy to explain why my husband, Glenn, and I give to Ohio University. I am the Ohio University graduate (Glenn is Penn State), but we both believe strongly in the critical importance of education to the future of our society and to help every individual reach their full potential as a human being. For me, Ohio U, with incredible teachers, a lovely campus, and wonderful friends gave me the education which led to personal fulfillment and a rich and rewarding life. So now we give.

Glenn and I both came from homes with strong values but little formal education and very little money. So we give scholarships – especially for student research in the sciences, teaching awards, Cutler scholarships for leadership, and campus enrichment through guest lectures.

Philanthropy underlies much of the social, educational and cultural activity in America. We live in a free society but with that freedom comes responsibility to help others and to build communities. Freedom is fragile if citizens are ignorant. Education can end poverty, reduce crime, and cure illness.

We heartily endorse Winston Churchill’s famous saying: “We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.” We hope to set an example for young people today about volunteering and “giving back” to the organizations and causes that we care about. We hope that others will learn that only by participating in democracy, can we protect and preserve it. We do “change our world” when we have “giving hearts.”

So our advice to today’s students would be: work hard, do your very best, help others and be happy. We hope to be remembered as a couple who were passionate about and supported science, research and technology, high quality education, and music and culture as the keys to a rich and rewarding life for every American.

Jeanette Grasselli Brown, ’50 and ‘78
December, 2015

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Dr. Jeanette Grasselli and Dr. Glenn Brown 

It is easy to explain why my husband, Glenn, and I give to Ohio University. I am the Ohio University graduate (Glenn is Penn State), but we both believe strongly in the critical importance of education to the future of our society and to help every individual reach their full potential as a human being. For me, Ohio U, with incredible teachers, a lovely campus, and wonderful friends gave me the education which led to personal fulfillment and a rich and rewarding life. So now we give.

Glenn and I both came from homes with strong values but little formal education and very little money. So we give scholarships – especially for student research in the sciences, teaching awards, Cutler scholarships for leadership, and campus enrichment through guest lectures.

Philanthropy underlies much of the social, educational and cultural activity in America. We live in a free society but with that freedom comes responsibility to help others and to build communities. Freedom is fragile if citizens are ignorant. Education can end poverty, reduce crime, and cure illness.

We heartily endorse Winston Churchill’s famous saying: “We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.” We hope to set an example for young people today about volunteering and “giving back” to the organizations and causes that we care about. We hope that others will learn that only by participating in democracy, can we protect and preserve it. We do “change our world” when we have “giving hearts.”

So our advice to today’s students would be: work hard, do your very best, help others and be happy. We hope to be remembered as a couple who were passionate about and supported science, research and technology, high quality education, and music and culture as the keys to a rich and rewarding life for every American.

Jeanette Grasselli Brown, ’50 and ‘78
December, 2015

" rel="lightbox">Dr. Jeanette Grasselli and Dr. Glenn Brown

Dr. T. Richard and Eleanora K. Robe 

Dr. T. Richard “Dick” Robe grew up in Athens, so Ohio University has always felt like home to him. His connections to the Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ College of Engineering and Technology run deep, because over the course of the last 65 years he was an undergraduate, a graduate student, an acting instructor, an instructor, a professor and a dean for 16 years, an institute director for 8 years, an OU Foundation trustee for 9 years, and an advisor to the NAE/OU international bioengineering Russ Prize for 20 years.  Dr. Robe and his wife, Eleanora “Ellie” who is also an OU graduate, not only dedicated many years in service to Ohio University, but also maintained a commitment to the Russ College and Ohio University through their charitable contributions. They have made financial contributions through charitable gift annuities and IRA charitable rollovers.

Over his many years of teaching and academic administrative jobs, Dr. Robe has demonstrated great enthusiasm in inspiring students to pursue their engineering education and develop their competence in engineering and leadership. Now, through their charitable contributions, he and Mrs. Robe are able to add opportunities for students to become better educated and well prepared to contribute to their profession and to society. Both Dr. and Mrs. Robe have dedicated their lives to engineering students, striving for excellence at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Dr. Robe maintains close ties with the University by returning each fall quarter to serve as one of the speakers for the Robe Leadership Institute as well as serving as one of the institute’s advisors. To him, “it is truly a joy to return and help students prepare for their future professional roles.”

We can all learn a thing or two from the Robes. They achieved success by staying dedicated to what is closest to their hearts. Their contributions and service have helped open the window of opportunity for many students at Ohio University. They not only helped to develop the programs of the T. Richard and Eleanora K. Robe Leadership Institute which was created and endowed in their honor in 1996 by the Russ College’s Board of Visitors, but they also established and funded the Robe Leadership Institute Professorship, the Robe-Cutler Scholarship as well as an endowment for the Russ College Ohio Delta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi to enhance its mission.

For Dr. and Mrs. Robe, it is all in the spirit of trying to make a better place for students, faculty and staff in the Russ College by building on the legacy of the Stockers, the Russes, and the many others who have generously contributed to the Russ College and the University’s success.

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Dr. T. Richard and Eleanora K. Robe 

Dr. T. Richard “Dick” Robe grew up in Athens, so Ohio University has always felt like home to him. His connections to the Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ College of Engineering and Technology run deep, because over the course of the last 65 years he was an undergraduate, a graduate student, an acting instructor, an instructor, a professor and a dean for 16 years, an institute director for 8 years, an OU Foundation trustee for 9 years, and an advisor to the NAE/OU international bioengineering Russ Prize for 20 years.  Dr. Robe and his wife, Eleanora “Ellie” who is also an OU graduate, not only dedicated many years in service to Ohio University, but also maintained a commitment to the Russ College and Ohio University through their charitable contributions. They have made financial contributions through charitable gift annuities and IRA charitable rollovers.

Over his many years of teaching and academic administrative jobs, Dr. Robe has demonstrated great enthusiasm in inspiring students to pursue their engineering education and develop their competence in engineering and leadership. Now, through their charitable contributions, he and Mrs. Robe are able to add opportunities for students to become better educated and well prepared to contribute to their profession and to society. Both Dr. and Mrs. Robe have dedicated their lives to engineering students, striving for excellence at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Dr. Robe maintains close ties with the University by returning each fall quarter to serve as one of the speakers for the Robe Leadership Institute as well as serving as one of the institute’s advisors. To him, “it is truly a joy to return and help students prepare for their future professional roles.”

We can all learn a thing or two from the Robes. They achieved success by staying dedicated to what is closest to their hearts. Their contributions and service have helped open the window of opportunity for many students at Ohio University. They not only helped to develop the programs of the T. Richard and Eleanora K. Robe Leadership Institute which was created and endowed in their honor in 1996 by the Russ College’s Board of Visitors, but they also established and funded the Robe Leadership Institute Professorship, the Robe-Cutler Scholarship as well as an endowment for the Russ College Ohio Delta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi to enhance its mission.

For Dr. and Mrs. Robe, it is all in the spirit of trying to make a better place for students, faculty and staff in the Russ College by building on the legacy of the Stockers, the Russes, and the many others who have generously contributed to the Russ College and the University’s success.

" rel="lightbox">Dr. T. Richard and Eleanora K. Robe

Dr. Vernon R. Alden

Ohio University receives basic support from the State of Ohio. It receives tuition payments from student’s dormitories and classrooms, buildings have been financed by bond issues, and whenever possible, federal grants are sought.

But to be a truly distinguished university – one that graduates can be really proud of—Ohio University needs substantive private support. We need private gifts to attract and hold outstanding faculty members; to enrich and diversify the curriculum; and to provide subsequent support to continue to attract top quality students who need funds to attend.

During the ten years I was president, we made substantial efforts to appeal to OHIO alumni to support the Annual Fund, and, whenever possible, to provide a named gift.

I personally derive great satisfaction from gifts I make to my own alma mater and especially those to Ohio University where my late wife, Marion, and I spent the most happy years of our lives.

Signed,

Vern Alden

" rel="lightbox">Dr. Vernon R. Alden

Dr. William C. Byham

Over the years, my wife, Carolyn, and I have taken great joy in seeing how our financial and volunteer contributions have been used to meet the goals of many nonprofits, particularly in education and the performing arts.  It has been so gratifying to watch each organization use the money for worthwhile and life-changing projects.

I can truly say that my life would be unbelievably different had I not discovered Industrial-Organization (I/O) Psychology at Ohio University.  After getting a solid foundation at Ohio University, I received my Ph.D. in I/O Psychology from Purdue University.  Thus, I felt great pride when I was able to help expand both universities’ offerings in I/O Psychology by funding chairs at the two institutions that did so much for me. In addition, for both universities, I provide two things that help students to grow professionally:  funding to attend professional conferences and the possibility of internships at my company, Development Dimensions International.  Meeting the outstanding students who are about to graduate puts a huge smile on my face.

Ohio University also played an important role in increasing my appreciation of the performing arts. I watched my first live ballet performance as a junior at OU and was totally taken by the art form.  The United States government is unique among advanced countries for what I view as meager funding of arts in general.  For years, Carolyn and I have felt that we needed to help make the performing arts something that everyone can experience.  That’s why we have funded a number of performance-related buildings and theaters in Pittsburgh.

I have had a wonderful life working with and meeting fascinating people from around the world thanks to the great start I got from Ohio University.

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Dr. William C. Byham

Over the years, my wife, Carolyn, and I have taken great joy in seeing how our financial and volunteer contributions have been used to meet the goals of many nonprofits, particularly in education and the performing arts.  It has been so gratifying to watch each organization use the money for worthwhile and life-changing projects.

I can truly say that my life would be unbelievably different had I not discovered Industrial-Organization (I/O) Psychology at Ohio University.  After getting a solid foundation at Ohio University, I received my Ph.D. in I/O Psychology from Purdue University.  Thus, I felt great pride when I was able to help expand both universities’ offerings in I/O Psychology by funding chairs at the two institutions that did so much for me. In addition, for both universities, I provide two things that help students to grow professionally:  funding to attend professional conferences and the possibility of internships at my company, Development Dimensions International.  Meeting the outstanding students who are about to graduate puts a huge smile on my face.

Ohio University also played an important role in increasing my appreciation of the performing arts. I watched my first live ballet performance as a junior at OU and was totally taken by the art form.  The United States government is unique among advanced countries for what I view as meager funding of arts in general.  For years, Carolyn and I have felt that we needed to help make the performing arts something that everyone can experience.  That’s why we have funded a number of performance-related buildings and theaters in Pittsburgh.

I have had a wonderful life working with and meeting fascinating people from around the world thanks to the great start I got from Ohio University.

" rel="lightbox">Dr. William C. Byham

Edwin L.* and Ruth E.* Kennedy

Edwin and Ruth shared a passion for the arts and gave back to their alma mater in ways that continue to benefit Ohio University and the regional community today. The University’s Kennedy Museum of Art (KMA) holds the Edwin L. and Ruth E. Kennedy Southwest Native American Collection, a collection Edwin Kennedy began in 1930 that includes Navajo textiles, weavings and jewelry. Both Edwin and Ruth Kennedy were lifetime supporters of Ohio University. Thanks to their gifts, KMA has grown into a world-class institution, bringing to the University and the region a wide range of permanent collections and traveling exhibitions, educational programming and special tours.

A native of Marion, Ohio, Edwin Kennedy went on to study at Ohio State University and finally at Harvard Business School. He served on the Ohio University Foundation Board of Trustees from 1959 to 1975.

Ruth and Edwin’s generosity not only established the collection at the museum but has endowed three major programs at OHIO: the Kennedy Lecture Series; the Distinguished Professor Award; and the The John C. Baker Fund.

" rel="lightbox">Edwin L.* and Ruth E.* Kennedy

Margaret M. and Robert D. Walter

Lift People Up: We are inspired to transform people’s lives to the next level by working with individuals and strengthening organizations in a strategic and sustainable way. We believe that philanthropy is our responsibility, choice and aspiration. Giving is a gift to us.

Our commitment is to support the underserved and vulnerable, particularly individuals and families of low socioeconomic households, those with physical, emotional, or learning disabilities, those who require short-term emergency assistance, as well as service members, veterans, their families and dependents. To do this in a more targeted way, we have defined specific areas of focus. These areas include: living out our faith in support of Christian-based organizations; empowering people by creating access to education; improving individuals’ access to healthcare; and, inspiring our home community through cultural and civic opportunities that improve the quality of life for all.

When engaged in giving, we leverage all assets, including time, talent and treasure, to their highest capacity. This is done through dialogue with diverse perspectives to achieve the next level of leadership, strategy, structure and sustainability. The result is a shared investment with others who have a common desire to make meaningful contributions throughout Central Ohio and to instill a desire to pay-it-forward for those who are impacted by our combined work.

" rel="lightbox">Margaret M. and Robert D. Walter

Robert Emmett Boyle and Debra Boger

Life and its experiences develop and dictate our journey on this planet. We must appreciate the value and uniqueness of our life and our fellow humans. If we are to appreciate our own value we must recognize the huge value of others. If in some way we can assist in the achievement of the goals and objectives of others who value and appreciate mutual values and focus, then we add value to our own self esteem as well as theirs. Along these lines, our experience has been exciting and rewarding by directly focusing our major philanthropy in the area of education.

As we have approached the past and certainly how we envision the future, mankind will require continual and revolutionary advancement through technological processes and development. The primary requirements for the critical production of a robust food and clean water supply; space exploration, travel and development; advancement in medical systems and drug manufacturing; as well as making progress in construction and all forms of technology, transportation, communication and the environment will always be the challenge. This is only possible with exceptional, continual, and massive support from the world’s technical and engineering infrastructure.

We consider engineering as the bridge for direction and strength and it has been our dream to in some real and tangible way advance and support this extraordinary profession and would hope through our involvement in supporting future generations of engineers we can “make a difference.”

Experience and research drive us to conclude that we are very fortunate to have Ohio University’s Russ College of Engineering and Technology available. Over many years it has demonstrated an exceptional capacity with an outstanding faculty and leadership that produced a premier quantity of exceptional graduates who go into the field and excel in making the world a much better place.  We have continually witnessed impressive and effective graduates who demonstrate integrity, professionalism, and strong discipline, that has a significant impact on our society and mankind.  We are proud and honored when we see those former students with whom we have been involved go out and make their mark upon the world. 

" rel="lightbox">

Robert Emmett Boyle and Debra Boger

Life and its experiences develop and dictate our journey on this planet. We must appreciate the value and uniqueness of our life and our fellow humans. If we are to appreciate our own value we must recognize the huge value of others. If in some way we can assist in the achievement of the goals and objectives of others who value and appreciate mutual values and focus, then we add value to our own self esteem as well as theirs. Along these lines, our experience has been exciting and rewarding by directly focusing our major philanthropy in the area of education.

As we have approached the past and certainly how we envision the future, mankind will require continual and revolutionary advancement through technological processes and development. The primary requirements for the critical production of a robust food and clean water supply; space exploration, travel and development; advancement in medical systems and drug manufacturing; as well as making progress in construction and all forms of technology, transportation, communication and the environment will always be the challenge. This is only possible with exceptional, continual, and massive support from the world’s technical and engineering infrastructure.

We consider engineering as the bridge for direction and strength and it has been our dream to in some real and tangible way advance and support this extraordinary profession and would hope through our involvement in supporting future generations of engineers we can “make a difference.”

Experience and research drive us to conclude that we are very fortunate to have Ohio University’s Russ College of Engineering and Technology available. Over many years it has demonstrated an exceptional capacity with an outstanding faculty and leadership that produced a premier quantity of exceptional graduates who go into the field and excel in making the world a much better place.  We have continually witnessed impressive and effective graduates who demonstrate integrity, professionalism, and strong discipline, that has a significant impact on our society and mankind.  We are proud and honored when we see those former students with whom we have been involved go out and make their mark upon the world. 

" rel="lightbox">Robert Emmett Boyle and Debra Boger

*indicates deceased

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